CAROLL MICHELS

Career Coach & Artist-Advocate

Career Development Workshops for Fine Artists

Career development workshops for fine artists are lively and participatory three and six-hour programs focusing on important issues that impact a fine artist's career.

THREE-HOUR WORKSHOP
● Overcoming basic problems of launching and sustaining a career as an artist.
● Tools and resources for launching your career and maintaining momentum.
● Exhibition and sales opportunities outside of the commercial gallery system.
● Preparing for the commercial gallery system.
● Pricing work and related issues.
● Developing website fine art portfolios, art marketing on the Internet, and using social media
● Dealing with rejection and the “overwhelm factor.”

 SIX-HOUR WORKSHOP

● Overcoming basic problems of launching and sustaining a career as an artist.
● Tools and resources for launching your career and maintaining momentum.
● Exhibition and sales opportunities outside of the commercial gallery system.
● Preparing for the commercial gallery system.
● Pricing work and related issues.
● Grants, fellowships and artist-in-residence programs.
● Public relations, marketing and networking.
● Understanding and using the corporate market.
● Developing website fine art portfolios, art marketing on the Internet, and using social media
● Dealing with rejection and the “overwhelm factor.”

Workshops are sponsored by arts organizations and college and university art departments, including: 

Alberta Art Institute, Alberta, Canada
Artists Talk on Art, New York City
Art Quilt Network, New York City
Arts Council of Indianapolis
Association for Visual Artists, Chattanooga
Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada
Beaver College, Glenside, Pennsylvania
Center for the Arts, Vero Beach, Florida
College of Art & Design, Center for Creative Studies, Detroit
Connecticut Commission on the Arts
The Cooper Union, New York City
The Council for the Arts Westchester, New York
County College of Morris, Randolph, New Jersey
Cultural Council of Santa Cruz, California
Alden B. Dow Creativity Center, Northwood University, Midland, Michigan
El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, Texas
Empire State College, New York City
Fashion Institute of Technology, New York City
Florida Artist Group, Inc., FL Gulf Coast University, Bonita Bay, Florida
The Greensboro Artists League, North Carolina
Hunter College, New York City
Kansas City Art Institute, Missouri
Kendall College of Art & Design, Grand Rapids, Michigan
Kirkpatrick Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Arts & Humanities Council of Charlotte County, Port Charlotte, Florida
Maryland College of Art and Design, Silver Spring
Marywood College, Scranton, Pennsylvania
Museum of American Folkart, New York City
New School for Social Research, New York City
New York Artists Equity
Oak Ridge Art Center & Fine Art Museum, Tennessee
Parsons School of Design, New York City
Pennsylvania Society of Goldsmiths
Pratt/Manhattan Center
Pro Arts, Oakland, California
Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Rockford Art Museum, Rockford, Illinois
Savannah College of Art and Design, Georgia
School of Visual Arts, New York City
The Sculpture Center, Cleveland, Ohio
State University of New York, Fredonia
Studio in A School Association, New York City
Suffolk Community College, Long Island, New York
Tennessee Arts Commission, Memphis
University of California at Long Beach
University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
University of Tennessee, Chattanooga
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
Womens Caucus on the Arts, New York City

 

 

 

Excerpts from How to Survive & Prosper as an Artist

Grants

"Artists who are apprehensive and skeptical about applying for grants have many misconceptions about who receives them. Skeptical artists deem themselves ineligible for various reasons, such as being too old or young, lacking sufficient or impressive exhibition or performance credits, or lacking the right academic background. They believe that the kind of work they are doing isn't considered "in" or that they lack the right connections, which implies that juries are rigged!.. However, on the basis of my own experiences as a grant recipient and juror, as well as the experiences of my clients (the majority of whom would not measure up to the tough stereotype that many artists have of “the perfect grant-winning specimen”), I am convinced that, for the most part, grant selection is a democratic process - meaning that everyone has a real chance."


Copyright 2016 by Caroll Michels. All rights reserved.

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